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Working in the Aye Lab is “not just a job: it’s now an adventure!”- Our lab won a 2017 Naval Research (ONR) YIP award. We are grateful for this prestigious recognition.

From Robotics to Lasers: Young Investigators Bring Big Promise, Get Big Awards

ONR Young Investigator Program

2017 ONR Young Investigators

About ONR

We are grateful for this prestigious recognition that will be used to gain more knowledge into precision gene regulation with small molecules.

Two Cornell PIs win 2017 Young Investigator awards from Navy

KINGFISHER: Fish-REX appears in Nature Chemical Biology and is highlighted in ‘News & Views’ in the same journal

Akt3 is a privileged first responder in isozyme-specific electrophile response:

Kingfisher (image from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingfisher)

Nature Chemical Biology doi:10.1038/nchembio.2284

SharedIt link powered by Springer Nature SharedIt Initiative:
http://rdcu.be/oJDN

http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nchembio.2284.html

News and Views:

Nature Chemical Biology doi:10.1038/nchembio.2311

http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nchembio.2311.html

Highlighted by the Cornell Chronicle (est. 1969):

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/01/group-uses-its-own-toolset-probe-chemical-responses

We thank all of the contributing team members: Sanjna is one of our eight undergrad researchers, and Yiran is one of our recently-graduated seniors currently in her gap-year internship applying to medical schools. Saba is an HHMI pre-doc fellow and one of the 5th-yr grad-student founding members of the Aye lab. Marcus and Yi are the two leading postdocs in our electrophile signaling research program. Dr Zhang is the Director of Cornell proteomics facility. We thank Professor Joe Fetcho, Brian Miller, and Nikki Gilbert for zebrafish technique transfer and generous sharing of the zebrafish husbandry and microinjection facility. We acknowledge intra- and extramural research and student awards supporting our electrophile signaling research program.

Sanjna won an Undergraduate Student Competitive Travel Award to present at the 2017 ASBMB National Meeting!

Sanjna will be presenting at the 2017 ASBMB Undergraduate Poster Competition in April! Sanjna has been with us since fall 2015 working with Saba and Marcus. Sanjna carries a third-authorship in one of our recently accepted papers

and is striving for more

sanjna

A New Year – a new RESource for biology of reactive chemical signals! Just Accepted by ACS Chemical Biology

2017 January 9: ACS Chemical Biology DOI: 10.1021/acschembio.6b01148

Contributing authors: Marcus, Jesse, and Soura

Correspondence author: Yimon

Subcellular Redox Targeting:

Bridging In Vitro and In Vivo Chemical Biology

 

cb-2016-011484-r2_toc_2017jan7

Networks of redox sensor proteins within discrete microdomains regulate the flow of redox signaling. Yet, the inherent reactivity of redox signals complicates the study of specific redox events and pathways by traditional methods. Herein, we review designer chemistries capable of measuring flux and/or mimicking subcellular redox signaling at the cellular and organismal level. Such efforts have begun to decipher the logic underlying organelle-, site-, and target-specific redox signaling in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight chemical biology as a perfect gateway to interrogate how Nature choreographs subcellular redox chemistry to drive precision redox biology.

Making use of T-REX in zebrafish – Just Accepted by Nature Chemical Biology

Akt3 is a privileged first responder in isozyme-specific electrophile response

(2016) Nature Chemical Biology Just Accepted (to be available online in January 2017)

Marcus J. C. Long#, Saba Parvez#, Yi Zhao, Sanjna L. Surya, Yiran Wang, Sheng Zhang, and Yimon Aye*

(#, co-first authors. *, corresponding author)

graphical-abstract_nchemb-bc160503840_2016nov18

We thank all of the contributing team members: Sanjna is one of our eight undergrad researchers, and Yiran is one of our recently-graduated seniors currently in her gap-year internship applying to medical schools. Saba is an HHMI pre-doc fellow and one of the 5th-yr grad-student founding members of the Aye lab. Marcus and Yi are the two leading postdocs in our electrophile signaling research program. Dr Zhang is the Director of Cornell proteomics facility.

Our Live-Cell T-REX Protocol is now available in Nature Protocols

Public Sharing Supported by Springer Nature Content Sharing Initiative, SharedIt link:

T-REX On-Demand Redox Targeting in Live Cells

nprot-2016-114-f2

Credit goes to all of the present and former Aye lab T-REX team members who contributed to building of this unique toolset from the ground up.

The development of this technology is supported by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation.

Our lab was recognized by the 2016-ICBS rising star chemical biologist award sponsored by ACS Chemical Biology – we are grateful for the support

Our lab was selected for a 2017 ACS WCC rising star chemist award – we thank the ACS WCC

Our latest Perspective “The Die is Cast” was selected as an ACS Editors’ Choice article and for the journal Cover Art

The Die is Cast: Precision electrophilic modifications contribute to cellular decision making

Peer-reviewed article contributed as part of 2016 ACS CRT Young Investigator Award to Aye Lab

slide1

This Perspective sets out to critically evaluate the scope of reactive electrophilic small molecules as unique chemical signal carriers in biological information transfer cascades. We consider these electrophilic cues as a new volatile cellular currency and compare them to canonical signaling circulation such as phosphate in terms of chemical properties, biological specificity, sufficiency, and necessity. The fact that non-enzymatic redox sensing properties are found in proteins undertaking varied cellular tasks suggests that electrophile signaling is a moonlighting phenomenon manifested within a privileged set of sensor proteins. The latest interrogations into these on-target electrophilic responses set forth a new horizon in the molecular mechanism of redox signal propagation wherein direct low-occupancy electrophilic modifications on a single sensor target are biologically sufficient to drive functional redox responses with precision timing. We detail how the various mechanisms through which redox signals function could contribute to their interesting phenotypic responses, including hormesis.

no spine minimum. half size. Editor: Maggie JEM: Diane RTP: Cynthia Porath